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20130119
20130119
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
example to that president eisenhower who worked with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama is up against an actual majority of conservative ho
. franklin roosevelt was moved by later movements. lyndon johnson had the civil rights movement. i think we begin with that. this book comes out at a moment when the country sees the power and possibility of occupy, 99%, and how that has shifted. it is still evolving. it has shifted the center of political gravity of our dialogue. the issue has been off the radar for so long. >> roosevelt surfed and harnessed those movements. he used them to get legislation passed to initiate programs. obama is still getting on his wet suit. to read the essay she wrote in 2008, there was a sense of exhibits -- exuberance. you say that hope is not optimism that expects things to turn out well. it seems like he confused those two things. >> i will come back to what i write about in the book. the expectations were so great and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into
. >> surely finding osama bin laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby. >> so if we can defeat the germans in world war ii, i guess the n.r.a. is supposed to be-- is that what he's saying? >> right, he's giving himself a little bit of wiggle room. i didn't exactly compare the nra to the nazis, stew $them in the same spot and let the audience sort it out. we're sure to see, on gun owners opponents of gun control and language when you see words likenazis. george orwell in 1946 a famous essay, the word fascism should only be used for people with hitler and-- that was 1946, 70 years later we're still doing it. >> jon: do you see it differently, judy? >> not really, i thought that schieffer was very close to the line of advocacy as opposed to reading the news and being straight about a news story. i do think that even though there was no direct comparison there's clearly an inference that the n.r.a. is equivalent to the nazis and raises questions whether o
consequences for it. >> he has been compared to lyndon johnson i think lyndon johnson used profanity strategically and as a bully tactic. when you're in a position of rahm emmanuel and you swear at somebody you can swear at them but they can't swear at you. just the fact that you're using profanity. one of the cases where this came up, this was in jonathan aldridge's book "the promise" take your f-ing tampons out and tell me what you have to have to say. that came up when a former senator wanted to make his temperament an issue. she said, no tampons. let's talk about tampons. this is not about tampons but how women would feel about someone who does that in the workplace. so i would say that it lowered the tone of the mayoral debates. >> after--sorry, after that the mayor grabbed me by the arm. his bodyguards came in. the question is has it been an affective management strategy in chicago? can you talk about the union strike, how did it go? how did it go when the mayor behaved this way? >> i would say no, because one of the most famous stories he was meeting with karen lewis president
to raise in. in the election, president lyndon johnson withdrew from the race, and hubert humphrey was nominated. on election night, george wallace one five states as an independent nominee. here is a resident nixon's swearing in and, about 20 minutes. -- and speech, about 20 minutes. >> do you richard milhouse nixon solemnly swear that you will faithfully exit queue the office -- >> that i will faithfully execute the office >> of president of the united states. >> of president of the united states. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states so that you got. >> and will, to the best of my ability, observe protect and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. [applause] ♪ >> senator dirksen, mr. chief justice, mr. vice president, president johnson, vice president humphrey, my fellow americans, and my fellow citizens of the world community, i ask you to share with me today the majesty of this moment. in the orderly transfer of power, we celebrate the unity that keeps us free. each moment in history i
to who i think is the king of them all. but lyndon johnson he picked up a couple. again, i'm using every thing i can find. pressing the flesh was a johnson is on. lady byrd johnson comes up with motorcade. it's picked up by time magazine. there was no example of that in writing before. richard nixon had some nice ones. expletive deleted is really his. when they go over the watergate trial, it became its own sort of curse word. another one was really interesting at the time. talking about winding down the war. george h. w. bush had his own words. the cheap shot was to say that these were all off the wall. the word resume came into the english language in 1531 and one other words of the words it was always attributed to him which was stranded jury, was actually a creation of saturday night live. [laughter] with the one you can really hang in business under estimate. there have been several pretty well-known people about language online. many top riders have said it is under estimate by mistake, what happens to all of us. so it may not be words like normalcy which will gradually become a mo
? we are americans. god bless you, and thank you. [applause] >> president lyndon johnson was inaugurated in 1965 for his first and only four-year term as the nation's 36 president. at the ceremony, lady bird started the tradition of first ladies holding the bible during the swearing-in. this is about 15 minutes. >> you do solemnly swear -- >> i do solemnly swear -- that you will faithfully execute -- >> that i will faithfully execute -- >> the office of the president of the united states, and will preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states so help you god. >> the office of the president of the united states and will preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states so help me god. [applause] >> my fellow countrymen, on this occasion the oath i have taken before you and before god is not mine alone, but ours together. we are one nation and one people. our fate as a nation and our future as a people rest not upon one citizen but upon all citizens. that is the majesty and the meaning of this moment. for every generation there is a d
. there were four inaugural balls awaiting them. lyndon johnson made history, after one of the darkest days in america, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than just a second term. the first to be carried on that thing called the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again, after already making history four years ago. in front of 2 million spectators. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. i'll see you from washington with a special edition tomorrow night. and we'll all see you here on monday. good night.
for dwight eisenhower giant platforms for the invited guests. lyndon johnson made history, the first president to ride to his inaugural in a bulletproof limo after the assassination of jfk. bill clinton ushering more than a second term. ushering the internet. on monday, president obama with the first lady by his side again since already making history four years ago. our special report on the swearing-in just before noon tomorrow. right here. i'll see you from washington tomorrow night. good night.
was rare. very, very rare. so in lyndon johnson's tenure as majority leader which ended when he was vice president in january of '61, there was one filibuster in his six years. and harry reid's six years, almost 400. that's the contrast. it's gradual. the right to filibuster has been there since the modern senate was there. but it's the perversion of senators that are willing to filibuster anything, any single thing they bring this to bear. >> describe that perversion. >> that perversion is everything from the almost 100 judicial vacancies that you talked about to many examples of recess appointments in the executive branch. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your
this after 380 filibusters compared to when lyndon johnson was the senate majority leader where he had one filibuster? >> well, this is the point, right? we have a senate that's frozen, broken, doesn't work. pick your favorite adjective or vertebrae. it's not working. this is not what democracy looks like. it's only on the first day and technically we're still in the first day of the congress, two-year period that this can be done by 51 senators, meaning in this case there's 55 in the democratic caucus and we'll take 51 of them. we need all of those 51 to stand up to have a senate that actually discusses the issues of the day. and allows the president's nominations to reach the floor and allows conference committees to actually meet. so when the house and senate pass two different bills there's a way to reconcile that. none of that is happening. >> harry reid said that he has been negotiating with senate minority leader mitch mcconnell to avoid having the so-called nuclear option. i would go so far as to say does mitch mcconnell even deserve to be in the position to negotiate what the sena
that polarization? >> you know what, lyndon johnson opened up the war on immigration in appalachia. most poor people are white, female and young, and black and brown hunger hurts. 50 million, these people are malnourished, homeless or wandering. they're unbankable, therefore they're driven into expensive loan arrangements. they are poor. they cannot send their children to school. they cannot dream. 50 million more very close to them, this impact of growing poverty and racial polarization and violence is a hell of a combination, and i would think that now we must in substance take a hard look at poverty. and some plan for economic reconstruction. look at places like inglewood, the president organized, london or austin, 45% unemployment. 50% unemployment. must be some targeted jobs planning and, of course, it's cheaper to educate than incarcerate. >> i remember most poignant memories about election night was a picture of you with tears streaming down your cheeks there in grand park, and i'm wondering if you have the same sort of combination of joy and hope that that expressed to me about the next four
states. >> the constitution of the united states. >> vice president lyndon johnson, takes the oath, which brings him together with the
eisenhower, lyndon johnson, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, jimmy carter, ronald reagan, george bush, and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact them and have them sign this historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it is one of those great pieces of history that has been long associated with this church, from 1856 till the present one of the little-known fact about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, and worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. people feel this is a longstanding tradition. it began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1933. when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the oath of office, in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and he organized a special service with his former headmaster at school, who participated in the church with coming up with a special service. the have that servic
the second lowest number of murders, 85, since lyndon johnson was president. so we have control around our crime issues. but the number of bullets that are fired from a magazine is something that we want to see stopped. nobody needs more than ten bullets. gun violence, background checks, is something we need to see in cities. so these common sense reforms, you now have more than 750 mayors that are standing behind the president and the vice president. and we think we're going to get a bill. it's going to be hard, it's going to be thank you. but i think we're finally going to get major gun violence reform. >> let's talk about one topic real quick where we know there is not so much partisan politics. very important question, mayor. will the atlanta falcons go to the super bowl? >> oh, no question. we're one game away, kate. we're going. >> all right. >> the objective political analysis from the atlanta mayor there. >> mayor, great to see you. >> thank you, kate. >> thank you so much. >> rooting for the hometown. cnn. >> for the first time, the presidential -- >> atlanta falcons, best in the
of the united states. >> constitution of the united states. >> vice president lyndon b. johnson and the grief-stricken widow with him takes the presidential oath aboard the jet, which brings him, together with the body of the late president, back to washington. >> the flag flies at half-staff. the full roosevelt cabinet is asked to remain in office. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> so help you god. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. ♪ >> filled with hope and patriotism. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to a very special edition of "cnn saturday morning." it is saturday, january 19th. i'm randi kaye, coming to you live from the national mall in washington, d.c., as we gear up for the 57th presidential inauguration. and all morning, our cnn political team will be bringing you the very latest on all the preparations for the big day and the biggest challenges as well, facing president obama in his second term. but first, we have some breaking news to tell you about. it involves the ongoing hostage crisis in algeria, involvi
. bush, lyndon johnson, jimmy carter, and george w. bush. >> by barack hussain obama do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term. sunday the official swearing-in ceremony live before noon. it begins with a look back at the 2009 inaugural address at 10:30 a.m. eastern. monday, the soaring and at noon eastern at the u.s. capitol and other festivities including the capitol lunch and and the parade. all the coverage begins at 7:00 eastern time on c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. join the conversation by telephone, facebook, facebook.com/cspan and twitter. >> our web site will have added features including video feeds from the spin cruise, video on demand of the major events -- it c-span crews, video on demand of the major events at c-span.org. president george h. the the bush was inaugurated on to the rate 20, 1989. he was ronald reagan's vice president ford two terms. president bush was one and using the same bible as george washington. this is about 25 minutes. >> i george herbert walker bush is always where -- >> i, george herbert walker bush, do so
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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